January 31

Coldest Girl In Cold Town

Coldest GirlTana lives in a world where walled cities called Coldtowns exist. In them, quarantined monsters and humans mingle in a decadently bloody mix of predator and prey. The only problem is, once you pass through Coldtown’s gates, you can never leave.
One morning, after a perfectly ordinary party, Tana wakes up surrounded by corpses. The only other survivors of this massacre are her exasperatingly endearing ex-boyfriend, infected and on the edge, and a mysterious boy burdened with a terrible secret. Shaken and determined, Tana enters a race against the clock to save the three of them the only way she knows how: by going straight to the wicked, opulent heart of Coldtown itself.

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown is a wholly original story of rage and revenge, of guilt and horror, and of love and loathing from bestselling and acclaimed author Holly Black.

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown is one of those rare Young Adult books that have me re-reading it both for enjoyment and to try to understand the author’s writing techniques. I’ve happily purchased this book and plan to continue re-reading and dismantling the book to my heart’s content.

Tana is refreshing. She isn’t a special snowflake, a lost princess or a chosen one.  She’s an ordinary girl with history and flaws, who is simply trying to survive in a world where vampires are a very real fear. She does her best, but she isn’t perfect. She makes mistakes and makes questionable decisions.  However, instead of her decisions being made because Black requires it, Tana has strong reasons for making them, giving her agency.

Black avoids stereotypes and tropes. Tana is not a virgin, but she’s not a hyper-sexualized being like I so often see in young adult books. She sits comfortably between those two extremes. Not all the characters in the book are heterosexual. Some are straight, some are bi and at least one is transsexual.

There is a bit of a romance in the book, but no love triangle, and Tana’s love interest is absent for half of the book. His absence allows Tana to figure out how to survive on her own, how to stay human on her own and how to save herself. She fights for herself and for other people, instead of waiting for someone to rescue her. Independent female characters with agency are rare in Young Adult fiction, especially when they have a romantic interest.

I love how Holly Black packs so much information about a character, or a setting in a single, descriptive sentence.  I keep re-reading her book partly to learn this skill and become proficient with it. I love her ability to show, and not tell. But, beyond her skills as a writer, I enjoy the story itself.

The book isn’t perfect. I don’t like Black’s trademark style of delving into the past every other chapter instead of staying in the story’s present. I know a few people who love that aspect to her books. I’ve always had mixed feelings on the ending. The story arc does end. However, there is room for a sequel. We’re left to decide if Tana manages to “cure” herself or if she damns herself, even with the help of her love interest. This wouldn’t bother me if I knew a second book was coming, but as of this writing, Black says she doesn’t anticipate writing a sequel.

If you don’t mind vampire novels that don’t follow the norm, pick up The Coldest Girl in Coldtown and give it a try.




Posted January 31, 2016 by RobinConnelly in category "Uncategorized

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