October 13

Slow Down. Breaking down and Setting Time limits

When I’m going to edit my own work, my process is usually predictable and simple.

Step one: Print the entire manuscript out.
Step two: Mark each individual chapter with post-it notes so chapters are easier to identify.
Step three: Break the book into 4ths–to the nearest chapter ending. So if the 1/4 mark is on page 60 and the chapter doesn’t end until page 63, the first quarter will contain 63 pages.
 Step four: Use paper clips to keep each fourth separated and together, except for the quarter I am working on. I do not always order the quarters in chronological order, though I am only allowed to work in one quarter at a time.
Step five: Edit an entire quarter.
Step six: Transfer notes for quarter edited onto computer.
Step seven: Start on next quarter
Step eight:  Repeat step five, six and seven until the entire manuscript is edited.
Step nine: Incorporate final notes and clean up final passages from edit.

During my first semester in Spalding’s MFA program, I’ve already seen a change in my editing processes, mainly due to needing to get my requirements throughout the semester, but the new procedure seems to have a much stronger effect on my novel than my original way of editing.  I can see and feel the changes in the novel almost instantly, whereas I may need to go through the above process three or four times before I truly noticed a consistent change in the draft, sometimes in entire chapters.

What is this new, more effective way of editing? It’s simple really.

I’ve been breaking the novel into sections for my packets. About 40 pages each–to the nearest chapter ending. So if I’m on my third pack of 40–with the packet supposed to end on page 120–but the nearest new chapter ends on page 119, I’d break it a page short. I work on the forty page section for three weeks. I am not allowed to work outside those 40 pages during those three weeks.  If I make all the major changes to the draft before my three weeks is up, I start at the beginning of the forty pages and do a deeper edit, grammar, sentence structure, smoothness, general clean up.  If their are changes I still want to make at the end of the three weeks, I make a note of it and MOVE onto the next section of forty pages.

How is what I’ve been doing, different from what I’ve started doing? Honestly if you break my novel down–at least before I started editing it, I’d have only had 5.5 sets of 40. So, I’d only be adding a section and a half to my original idea, which can’t make too much of a difference right?

I think the difference is the forced three weeks to work on the section. By setting that time limit, I force myself to slow down, to really look at my writing, no matter how much I may want to be done with the round of editing. Without the time limit set, I would push through the entire novel at my pace.  I’d make notes to make major changes, however I missed a lot of the changes that were also needed in that same section because I wasn’t looking closely enough.  This also works to keep me motivated, focused on working on my story, so that I can make sure all the changes that need to happen can be made, instead of delayed for another draft.

If you’re needing a new method of editing, this one may be worth trying.

June 26

Response from Lesléa

I got an initial response from my mentor, Lesléa, about the material I sent her for my first packet. I got a lot of positive feedback on Shadowed and my short critical essays. However Entangled, unsurprisingly, needs a lot of work.  I agree with most of the comments she made. And suspected some of the issues she mentioned.

Entangled needs a work and right now, with the initial comments thrumming in my head, I’m not sure how to make some of the changes, specifically, how do I get Maline into his role without readers going, “A real mother would question that”? I’ve had a few people who have already made suggestions on how I could possibly make it work.  I really like a few of them, but I need to see what kind of changes that would mean for the draft I have and how to make them all work, or use those ideas as inspiration.

Does anyone have ideas?  Anyone else willing to look at the fifteen pages I’m working on?  Or someone who is willing to just play sound board for me while I figure it out?

Lesléa’s email was encouraging but she did not hold back on what she thought needed improvement. So far, I only have an email from Lesléa. From what I understand she’ll be sending my submissions through the mail with her notes in the margins.  So I may get more detailed notes on the material when the packet arrives.  It seems to take mail a week to reach me from the East Coast, so I probably won’t get it until late this week, early next week. But I will let everyone know when I get it.

I also will be reading Inkheart by Cornelia Funke instead of How It Ends by Laura Wiess. If you recall, How It Ends was on my original reading list at the very beginning of the semester. So far, no other books have been switched out.

For my next packet I plan on reading:

  • Inkheart by Cornelia Funke
  • Briar Rose by Jane Yolen
  •  Girl Meets Boy This is due around the time my packet is but isn’t necessarily part of packet 2.
  • Make A Scene: Crafting A Powerful Story One Scene At A Time by Jordan E. Rosenfeld  This one is more to help me make the changes I needed to make and not a necessity for the school semester.

I now have a Goodreads account for those who would like to follow my reading progress.

I’ll keep all of you up-to-date.
Thanks for the help and support.

Edited: Got the Hard copy packet today.

June 20

A Writer’s Retreat

As some of you know, I am a member of several writer’s groups. One of the groups I’m involved in is the Romance Writers of America (RWA). I am an active member of the Coeur du Bois chapter. I’ve been a member for almost a year now and I have no regrets in joining the RWA chapter. I’ve gained a great number of writing resources, writing friends and learned a lot things about writing. Usually, the group  meets once a month to discuss various topics on writing, whether it’s how to write dialogue, or build an author platform. However, this month their is no meeting.

From June 21-23, the Coeur du Bois chapter (CBC) is hosting a writing retreat for its members in McCall, Idaho.  The idea of the retreat is simple: escape the world, get away from the distractions that make writing hard, and write. The only thing keeping us from writing is other writers, which may or may not be a necessary part of the process, depending on where in your writing you are.

I have never been to a writer’s retreat.  But I have heard of them in the past, and, since the retreats are an annual event, I’ve heard nothing but good things about the experiences from fellow CBC members. One person told me she got 25,000 words written during one of the retreats. Food is paid for by the CBC, though we are encouraged to bring food for ourselves or to share with other members if we like. I’m looking forward to it and, honestly, the trip couldn’t have arrived at a better time.

My current homework packet is due on Wednesday.  As soon as I turn it in, I need to start working on the material for my second packet.  So I’ll start working on my second packet at the retreat! It’ll be the perfect place to get a great start on my editing and writing.

I’ve also never been to McCall before. I’ve had family members and fellow writer’s tell me it is beautiful.  On Google, I find pictures of a lake, woods, mountains, old-fashioned buildings.  It sounds ideal and I intend to take a camera with me to take a lot of pictures. Going off the map, it appears the cabin we’ll be staying at will be relatively close to the lake. The cabin itself looks attractive and will no doubt help spur my imagination into overdrive. Hopefully I can keep up with my imagination.

June 6

Spalding: MFA Program Worth It?

I’ve been asked by a few writing friends if I thought the MFA program I’m in at Spalding will be worth the cost of tuition. Obviously I think so, otherwise I wouldn’t be enrolled and I won’t know for certain how I feel about the entire program until after I get through my first semester. But I thought I would explain what I’ve heard about MFA programs, what I’ve seen at Spalding, and what I think of the program so far for those who are curious.

**Please note, I’m not trying to promote Spalding.  It’s the only true reference I have to pull from experience-wise.**

A little information on Spalding first.  Spalding’s MFA program is a low-residency program.  That means students need to be on campus ten days a semester, which they call residency, unless you’re attending a summer semester.  In that case your 10 days will be spent in a foreign country.  This year students went to Paris, France. Next summer, they’ll go to Dublin, Ireland.  After the residency, students work from home with guidance from their mentor. Spalding offers Children’s/Young Adult fiction, Fiction, Screenwriting, Playwriting, Poetry, and Creative Non-fiction.  I learned about Spalding, because I was in close proximity of the school in High School.  I did not know about the MFA program until I saw it listed as one of the top 10 creative writing MFA programs in multiple writing magazines. To learn more about the program go to Spalding’s MFA website.

Creative Writing MFA programs only write literary fiction.

I’ve heard and read this a lot. I’ve also read that because they only write literary fiction, a lot of writing suffered from the program.  The author was a contemporary novelist and the school insisted on him/her writing literary. This was a concern for me. I’m a a contemporary writer and though I don’t mind reading literary pieces, I don’t believe I’d do well with that style of writing on more than a trial basis. This was especially a concern when I realized that the two books we needed to read before residency were both literary fiction.  However, we were required to workshop our peers writing during the residency as well. I found some reassurance in reading the excerpts.  Their were contemporary pieces to critique.

During the actual residency at Spalding, I picked up on a lot of their techniques and logic. They want their students well-rounded. So each semester they focus on a different aspect/genre of writing that they expect everyone to participate in during residency. Of course, they offer lectures on other topics, subjects and material. This semester the focus was on children’s books.  Next semester, from what I understand, the focus will be on screenwriting. They prefer students to do an exploratory semester their second semester–have them try something other than their focus.  A lot of people suggested I try screenwriting out, next semester. I believe you can try a different style for every semester if you like though. The different types of experiences will help the writing in different ways. Poetry for instance teaches rhythm and imagery.  Screenwriting teaches you how to tell a lot in a very short amount of space/time, etc.

No one said anything about restricting oneself to literary fiction when writing.  In fact a lot of contemporary novels were referenced in lectures. I’ve heard that a lot of MFA programs are literary focused, but I do not get the sense that Spalding is.

Creative Writing MFA programs result in one or two short stories a semester.

I work-shopped with ten students, an alum who was volunteering to help with the program and two mentors. I met several other people outside the group.  None of which, are going to be writing short stories during the semester. I will be working on two novels during my first semester.  Shadowed, and Entangled.

I’ve been editing Shadowed for years, as some of you may know.  I first wrote a rough draft of Entangled at fifteen.  I’ve rewritten it several times since then, in totally different ways, but have not yet fallen in love with a discovery draft yet. I doubt either book will be complete by the end of the semester.  But I imagine Shadowed will be much cleaner, more polished and significantly closer to being ready for publication. Hopefully I’ll have a better idea of how I want to write out Entangled and even have a much stronger discovery draft–if not a rough draft carved out.

I’m hoping to have gone through the first 100 pages of both books with my mentor by the end of the semester.

I’ve heard from a few transfer students that their are writing programs like this–they have you turn short stories in throughout the semester and nothing more.  This often results in students graduating from college and never writing a story again, because they wrote to fill a deadline.  Spalding, I’m told, wants to teach students how to fit writing into their daily life, which is why they have the mentorship working the way they do.

Creative Writing MFA programs don’t teach you anything you can’t learn on your own.

I believe you can learn anything on your own, from car mechanics to archery to martial arts to crocheting.  Classes are always offered in those areas though. So, this statement is true in my mind, but I imagine you’ll learn a lot more and a lot faster with an experienced mentor at your side. Spalding’s mentors have all been published in their field. I know several of the ones in my field of concentration have won awards for their writing and have active careers. Each semester you’re supposed to work with a different mentor, which would give you more/different perspectives and experiences in writing, and in your writing than working with the same person year-after-year-after-year. You’re going to continue learning after the program–you never stop learning, but by the time I graduate from Spalding, I suspect I’ll have a better idea of how to figure out how to improve my writing and use the resources I picked up on, which will make me improve faster, even on my own.

You also meet a lot of great people at the residency, which not only can help you with your writing, or promoting your book but can also provide you with the emotional support you need when times are hard. You also have a great potential resource of information in areas you may need later for other books.  I met nurses, doctors, lawyers, waitresses, career-military, a baker…etc. A lot of great sources you’re not going to easily get on your own.

Creative Writing MFA programs are expensive.

Depending on your program and your income, they can be expensive. The lowest-priced one I’ve heard of is $7,000 a semester. At the moment, Spalding is looking at $7,900 a semester. Some will say that’s chump change, others, like me, will not.  Their are options, grants and scholarships can help with the cost, even for freshman.  Spalding doesn’t offer grants and only a very select few get scholarships, from my understanding.  Spalding does offer an assistantship program for those who want to go that route.  The more you work, the more they knock your tuition down.  I think the minimum they’ll knock it is $1,000. And, of course, student loans. Spalding allows you to stay in the program as long as you need, so long as you graduate in ten years.

My understanding of this is, you can apply for Spalding, pay $8,000 in cash for your first semester.  Wait two years to save up another $8,000, attend your second semester and keep the pattern going until you graduate.  You only need four semesters to graduate. It just depends on what you prefer and can afford.

Another way to think of it is that, sending your novel to a good, professional editor would cost approximately the same amount as you are spending on a semester at Spalding. (I’ve looked into the pricing but not extensively, so please correct me if you have better knowledge.)  I don’t just mean copy editing.

I’ve been told my mentor will read every page, dissect every paragraph and question every comma. She’ll make suggestions on how to improve my story AND help me get the story as grammatically correct as possible. That means I’d get proofreading, copy editing, substantive editing, and  developmental editing.  To get all those services, from what I’ve seen, you’ll have to pay significantly more than $8,000 a semester. All the while learning a lot more about writing than one would from such an editor.  I’m also not required to work on the same piece of writing for all four semesters.  I can work on something different each semester if I want.

To me, with everything I know about Spalding’s program, I think it’ll be worth going to an MFA program. I would recommend it to whoever is interested at this point, but I know it’s not for everyone. If this has tugged your interest and you’d like to know more about Spalding’s program, feel free to ask questions. I’ll do my best to answer them. As I’ve mentioned before, I also plan on recording as much of the experience as I can on this blog.

Are you in an MFA program?  Tell us about your experience. Would you be interested in trying one?  What would you most hope to gain from the program?