January 31

Coldest Girl In Cold Town

Coldest GirlTana lives in a world where walled cities called Coldtowns exist. In them, quarantined monsters and humans mingle in a decadently bloody mix of predator and prey. The only problem is, once you pass through Coldtown’s gates, you can never leave.
One morning, after a perfectly ordinary party, Tana wakes up surrounded by corpses. The only other survivors of this massacre are her exasperatingly endearing ex-boyfriend, infected and on the edge, and a mysterious boy burdened with a terrible secret. Shaken and determined, Tana enters a race against the clock to save the three of them the only way she knows how: by going straight to the wicked, opulent heart of Coldtown itself.

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown is a wholly original story of rage and revenge, of guilt and horror, and of love and loathing from bestselling and acclaimed author Holly Black.

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown is one of those rare Young Adult books that have me re-reading it both for enjoyment and to try to understand the author’s writing techniques. I’ve happily purchased this book and plan to continue re-reading and dismantling the book to my heart’s content.

Tana is refreshing. She isn’t a special snowflake, a lost princess or a chosen one.  She’s an ordinary girl with history and flaws, who is simply trying to survive in a world where vampires are a very real fear. She does her best, but she isn’t perfect. She makes mistakes and makes questionable decisions.  However, instead of her decisions being made because Black requires it, Tana has strong reasons for making them, giving her agency.

Black avoids stereotypes and tropes. Tana is not a virgin, but she’s not a hyper-sexualized being like I so often see in young adult books. She sits comfortably between those two extremes. Not all the characters in the book are heterosexual. Some are straight, some are bi and at least one is transsexual.

There is a bit of a romance in the book, but no love triangle, and Tana’s love interest is absent for half of the book. His absence allows Tana to figure out how to survive on her own, how to stay human on her own and how to save herself. She fights for herself and for other people, instead of waiting for someone to rescue her. Independent female characters with agency are rare in Young Adult fiction, especially when they have a romantic interest.

I love how Holly Black packs so much information about a character, or a setting in a single, descriptive sentence.  I keep re-reading her book partly to learn this skill and become proficient with it. I love her ability to show, and not tell. But, beyond her skills as a writer, I enjoy the story itself.

The book isn’t perfect. I don’t like Black’s trademark style of delving into the past every other chapter instead of staying in the story’s present. I know a few people who love that aspect to her books. I’ve always had mixed feelings on the ending. The story arc does end. However, there is room for a sequel. We’re left to decide if Tana manages to “cure” herself or if she damns herself, even with the help of her love interest. This wouldn’t bother me if I knew a second book was coming, but as of this writing, Black says she doesn’t anticipate writing a sequel.

If you don’t mind vampire novels that don’t follow the norm, pick up The Coldest Girl in Coldtown and give it a try.

January 20

New Papercuts Podcast Released

I don’t imagine I’ll do this often, but since I did take a year-long hiatus from this blog, I thought I should mention that I am a founding member of Papercuts Podcast and one of three hosts.

We use the podcast to praise/bitch about the state of Young Adult media. We feature: YA book and movie reviews, trope talks, author interviews and whatever else us girls find relevant. We recently released our latest Podcast.  This one is on National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), where the goal is to write 50,000 words in thirty days. We discuss tips and tricks on how to win NaNo. The reasons you should and shouldn’t do NaNo. What to do once NaNo is over and more.

Here’s the podcast.  Though if you want to see the real page with all the juicy stuff that’s included you can go to: http://papercutspodcast.com/?p=688.  Be warned, we don’t watch our language, hold back on threats, or hide our dirty minds.


Right click to download

 

January 13

Stoking the Motivational Fire in Your Writing

Writing has always been my companion. I tell people that I was born with a pen in my hand. Through my childhood, writing was my best escape from childhood bullying. It’s been my best weapon against loneliness and despair. I wrote my first novel-length story by the time I was twelve. As a college student, friends would complain that by the time they started reading my work, I’d have re-written half of it. As an adult, my motivation to write has waned. There could be any number of reasons for this, but I can’t say why.

I still love reading. I still enjoy writing, but where I used to get physically ill if I didn’t write every day, now I struggle to put pen to paper. I’ve been trying a few things out and I’m glad to say I’m getting some of my motivation back.

Return to Your Roots

Before I graduated High School I was surrounded by music. My brothers and I constantly had something playing on our CD player, or boombox. We’d dance at random intervals, simply because we really liked a particular song. I listened to songs over and over while I was writing. The music would become background noise, something I ceased to hear at one point, but writing came easily. When I got stuck on a scene in my story, or had no clue where my plot was going, I’d exchange music with one of my brothers. Usually that knocked the devilish idea I needed lose.

Music didn’t disappear once I left for college, but it became a much smaller part of my life. While surviving schoolwork, jobs, internships and a social life, I wasn’t surrounded by music. I exchanged songs with friends on occasion, but it wasn’t the same. Once I graduated with my BA, I moved to Idaho, and music took up even less of my life. I didn’t have a boombox. I had an MP3 off and on—I’m usually behind the times—and my background noise turned into movies I’d watched dozens of times over and over. Every once in a while I’d dig through my music collection and that was usually to get rid of a persistent, unending song.

Lately I’ve been returning to my music roots. I have a stereo and constantly have it playing a CD, an mp3 or the radio while I’m home. I haven’t turned the television on since getting the stereo set up in my room, and I have no immediate desire to change that. I’m shifting through YouTube and Pandora for songs that spark something in me; as well as taking recommendations from friends. My urge to write has grown significantly, though it still isn’t where it once was.

Research/Fill the Well

When I hear fill the well, it’s usually in reference to doing something physical outside of writing, like walking, going to a fair, getting out of the house. I do find those types of activities helpful, but I also find research to be equally helpful in filling my well.

While at work, if I’m not interested in listening to music, I’ll listen to documentaries on YouTube. It can be about anything, so long as it interests me. I’ve listened to videos on the history of guns, studied all the English royals, learned about Ivar the Boneless, Hellewise Pennington, and Aphra Behn. I’ve watched videos on writing, fighting, traveling, and so much more. Most of it has nothing to do with what I’m currently writing, but the new information swirls in my head, ready to be used. Sometimes, a completely random thing I hear in the video makes me look at my story in a different way, spawning potential plot bunnies for me to follow, thus getting me to write. By allowing myself to research outside of what is necessary for my book, I’m learning a lot, expanding my mind and opening the door to getting plenty more story ideas. Most importantly I’m filling the well.

Set Goals

Goals can come in different sizes. One of my New Year’s Resolutions is to get a draft of my sequel completely written. Like most people I didn’t set any parameters on how I’d go about accomplishing this. This is partially because I see New Year’s Resolutions more as guides. What do I want to accomplish? And if, for some reason, I have to change the goal, I can. I’m not tied down to the stone it’s written on, so I won’t drown if I toss it in the lake.

If I write what I’d like to accomplish the next day down in my journal, I significantly increase my chances of doing it. Sometimes I’m very specific on what those goals are “I’m going to edit the entire fight scene in this book” or “I’m going to come up with new words for an hour.” Other times, I’m less specific, “I’m going to get some editing done,  or some new words written tomorrow.” Both are equally effective for me. I can celebrate my success in meeting those goals or commit to doing better in the next day’s entry, which in a weird way creates the accountability that I’ve been lacking. If you don’t keep a journal, I imagine you could post goals on your blog, or Facebook or Twitter. If you’re more private, finding a friend that will ask you “Did you make your goal?” may do the trick.

Those small, miniature, daily goals can help you work toward your big goal. If my daily goal always involves some kind of editing or writing, I’m making progress toward finishing a draft of my sequel and to completing my New Year’s Resolution.

Compete With Yourself

One thing I’m learning is that comparing yourself to other people leads to depression and writer’s block. Instead of thinking “I’m a failure. I’m twenty-six and haven’t published anything, but so-and-so is twenty-two and he/she has published so many books,” I’m trying to compete with myself. In the last few months, I’ve written down what my current word count is on the last day of each month. That way I can see how many words I wrote in the last month. I then tell myself, I’m going to write more the upcoming month. I’m going to compete with myself to get that higher word count. This pushes me to work harder without damaging my self-esteem or making me feel that no matter what I write, or how many times I re-write, I’m producing shit. It also helps keep the fire of motivation burning underneath me, so I write more regularly than I have in a long time. I’m sure I’ll experiment with other things to use against myself, but, for now, word counts work.

With bills to pay, a job to work, the stress of home life to contend with, life seems to do its best to drown the flames of your motivation. But hopefully some of these tricks will help you keep the flames burning. Have you tried any of these tricks? And what tricks do you use to stay motivated? Let me know in comments!

January 3

Robin Returns!

Time did not escape me. I am well-aware I haven’t updated my blog in over a year.  With me working a full-time job, going to school as a full-time student, making occasional podcasts for Papercuts and attempting to have a life, some things were bound to fall into neglect.  Unfortunately this blog was one of them.

I now possess a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree in Creative Writing. Life is settling down with me out of school and I’m picking up the loose strands in my life.  This blog is one of those strands. I will be updating the website. I also intend to update this blog once a week, with the hope that posts will increase with time.  This blog will contain book reviews, information on writing, the occasional guest post and author interview and snippets of life. Suggestions are welcome.  Just leave a comment or contact me on what you’d like to see.

If you haven’t already, you can subscribe  and you’ll get an email whenever I update my blog.

Thanks!